Wireless Networking Without a Router

Ad Hoc Networking Can Save You the Hassle of a Router

If you’ve looked at network elements lately, you may have discovered that while wireless network adapters are cheap, wireless routers aren’t. Fortunately, cordless networking innovation can connect up to lots of computer systems together in an ad-hoc network, without the hassle of cabling or the expense of a router.
This kind of network functions similar to a wired “mesh,” where every computer system is directly linked to every other computer system. In an ad hoc network, computers link wirelessly and automatically, offering the advantages of file, printer, and Internet sharing without a router.
As soon as you’ve installed your network cards, go to your Network Connections (discovered in the Control Panel) and open your wireless connection’s homes. Select the Wireless Networks tab and, if no cordless networks exist, click Include and name your new connection.
With Windows XP, folders and printers can be shared quickly through your ad hoc network, but a major factor users network their computer systems is to share an Internet connection. With a computer already linked to the Web, this is simple.
Make sure the computer with an Internet connection is on the ad hoc network, go to the wired Internet connection’s Advanced tab and check “Enable other computers to connect with this computer’s Internet connection.” Restart the other computers and they should all have Internet gain access to.
Allowing the Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) is a good idea for ease and simpleness. Non-Microsoft firewalls might not like other computer systems using your Internet connection, and additional configuration might be needed.
Data file encryption (under the wireless network’s properties) ought to likewise be made it possible for to improve security on your network. The network vital settings are proprietary; examine the network card’s documents for information on the settings. It’s essential to understand that with data file encryption allowed, actual connection speeds will be cut in half.
Among the biggest problems with cordless networking is signal attenuation, or the loss of signal from interference; too lots of walls between computer systems may lead to poor or nonexistent connections. The obvious solution is to move the computers closer together, but if that’s infeasible or undesirable, the user may desire to consider getting a Cantenna, a simple tool that greatly enhances a cordless signal.
Ad hoc networking likewise utilizes more overhead to make its connections than those made by a router. For small networks this isn’t really a problem, but big ones could experience significant stagnation.
And if sharing an Internet connection, the online computer must be turned on for others to access the ‘Net.
Despite its flaws, ad hoc networking gives the budget-conscious user an easy alternative to getting a wireless router. For many homes, this can be an ideal method to prevent the expense of a wireless router and the clutter of a wired network.

When you’ve installed your network cards, go to your Network Links (discovered in the Control Panel) and open your wireless connection’s properties. Select the Wireless Networks tab and, if no wireless networks exist, click Add and call your new connection. Data file encryption (under the wireless network’s properties) ought to also be enabled to enhance security on your network. The network key settings are exclusive; examine the network card’s documentation for info on the settings.

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